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Use this page to browse all content from the Voting Technology Project, sorted by last updated.

Reducing Obstacles to Voting for People with Disabilities

Working Paper No.: 
116
Date Published: 
06/22/2013
Author(s): 
Lisa Schur, Rutgers University

The Presidential Commission on Election Administration’s mission includes identifying best practices and making recommendations to promote voting accessibility and improve the experiences of voters with disabilities.  This White Paper reviews the evidence on voter turnout and voting difficulties among people with disabilities, and identifies best practices for removing obstacles that can limit their ability to exercise the right to vote.  As will be seen, while progress has been made, significantly more needs to be done to make the election system fully accessible.

Report on Provisional Ballots and American Elections

Working Paper No.: 
115
Date Published: 
06/21/2013
Author(s): 
Daron Shaw, University of Texas at Austin
Vincent Hutchings, University of Michigan

Overview

Lessons from the 2012 Election Administration and Voting Survey

Working Paper No.: 
113
Date Published: 
08/03/2013
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III, MIT
Daron Shaw, UT Austin

Since our country’s inception, collecting appropriate data on elections and the administration of elections has been somewhat problematic, due to the fact that multiple levels of government are involved in running elections in the U.S. and because of difficulties in obtaining comparable information from the different states and localities.  Beginning with the 2004 elections, the Election Assistance Commission has conducted national surveys of election administrators in an effort to facilitate a better understanding of how U.S.

Administration of Absentee Ballot Programs

Working Paper No.: 
112
Date Published: 
07/15/2013
Author(s): 
Barry C. Burden, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Brian J. Gaines, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Executive Summary

  1. Americans cast their ballots in three main ways: at a traditional neighborhood polling place on election day; early, in person at a government office or voting center; and absentee, which is usually submitted early by mail.  The proportion of all ballots cast by the latter two methods continues to rise steadily.

  2. The introduction and expanded use of convenience (absentee and early) voting does not seem to have increased voter turnout.

The Recruitment and Training of Poll Workers: What We Know from Scholarly Research

Working Paper No.: 
111
Date Published: 
09/06/2013
Author(s): 
Barry C. Burden, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jeffrey Milyo, University of Missouri

In every election an army of temporary poll workers must be recruited and trained to both assist the public in exercising the right to vote and to enforce the rules governing the voting process.  These poll workers are geographically dispersed and serve as the front line workers interacting with tens of millions of voters.  Principal-agent theory suggests that this is a difficult task for election officials.

Voting Made Safe and Easy: The Impact of e-voting on Citizen Perceptions

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez, Caltech
Ines Levin, University of Georgia
Julia Pomares, Center for Implementation of Public Policities Promoting Equity and Growth, Marcelo Leiras, Universidad de San Andres and Conicet
Journal: 
Political Science Research and Methods
pp: 
117-137
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
06/12/2013

AbstractVoting technologies frame the voting experience. Different ways of presenting information to voters, registering voter choices and counting ballots may change the voting experience and cause individuals to re-evaluate the legitimacy of the electoral process. Yet few field experiments have evaluated how voting technologies affect the voting experience. This article uses unique data from a recent e-voting field experiment in Salta, Argentina to study these questions.

Voting Made Safe and Easy: The Impact of e-voting on Citizen Perceptions

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez, Caltech
Ines Levin, University of Georgia
Julia Pomares, Center for Implementation of Public Policities Promoting Equity and Growth, Marcelo Leiras, Universidad de San Andres and Conicet
Journal: 
Political Science Research and Methods
pp: 
117-137
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
06/12/2013

AbstractVoting technologies frame the voting experience. Different ways of presenting information to voters, registering voter choices and counting ballots may change the voting experience and cause individuals to re-evaluate the legitimacy of the electoral process. Yet few field experiments have evaluated how voting technologies affect the voting experience. This article uses unique data from a recent e-voting field experiment in Salta, Argentina to study these questions.

Waiting to Vote in 2012

Working Paper No.: 
110
Date Published: 
04/01/2013
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III, MIT

Prepared for the conference on “The Voting Wars: Elections and the Law from Registration to Inauguration,” University of Virginia Law School, March 23, 2013, Charlottesville, Virginia.  This paper uses data from the 2008 and 2012 Survey of the Performance of American Elections, which was generously funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts, which bears no responsibility for the analysis found herein. Waiting in line to vote is one of the clichés of Election Day, whether the venue is Kenya or the United States.  The length of time waiting to vote has regularly been an issue in the voting wars of t

Pattern Matching Encryption, Strategic Equivalence of Range Voting and Approval Voting, and Statistical Robustness of Voting Rules

Working Paper No.: 
109
Date Published: 
02/13/2013
Author(s): 
Emily Shen, MIT

AbstractWe present new results in the areas of cryptography and voting systems.

Western Political Science Association Conference

At the upcoming WPSA meeting on March 28-30 in Hollywood, CA, we have several colleagues who will be presenting papers, and participating in panels.Panel 26.04, Electoral Processes and Voting (Sarah Hill, from the University of Fullerton will be a discussant).Panel 26.06, Electoral Reform.Panel 26.08, Technology, Elections and Voting --- Lonna Atkeson from the University of New Mexico is the chair.Panel 26.10, Voter Turnout and Mobilization --- Betsy Sinclair, University of Chicago, is giving paper.You can see these and the others at:

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