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Use this page to browse all content from the Voting Technology Project, sorted by last updated.

Residual Votes Attributable to Technology: An Assessment of the Reliability of Existing Voting Technologies

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
This report examines the use of voting equipment and the incidence of spoiled and unmarked ballots associated with that equipment. We call the rate of spoiled and unmarked ballots the residual vote rate. The residual vote rate is not a pure measure of voter error. If voting technologies are not producing voter mistakes or confusion, the residual vote rate should be unrelated to equipment. The study covers election results from over 2700 counties and municipalities in the 1988, 1992, 1996, and 2000 presidential elections.

Poll Workers and the Vitality of Democracy: An Early Assessment

Author(s): 
Kelly D. Patterson
J. Quin Monson
Thad E. Hall
Journal: 
PS: Political Science and Politics
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
No abstract available.

How Hard Can It Be: Do Citizens Think It Is Difficult to Register to Vote?

Author(s): 
Morgan Llewellyn
Thad E. Hall
R. Michael Alvarez
Journal: 
Stanford Law & Policy Review
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Political equality is seen as an intrinsic normative principle for the adequate functioning of a democratic republic. However, it is well documented that in the United States there are many qualified citizens who do not vote, many who do not participate in the political process due to procedural barriers that make it difficult or impossible for them to register and vote.

Bridging Science, Technology, and Politics in Election Systems

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Erik Antonsson
Journal: 
The Bridge
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Shortly after the tumult of the evening of November 7 and the morning of November 8, 2000, the presidents of Caltech and MIT challenged us to solve the technological problems that had arisen in the election, especially with the punch-card voting systems that were widely disparaged after Florida’s presidential contest. Our initial research team spanned the continent and involved two campuses with different research and administrative cultures.

A Methodology for Testing Voting Systems

Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Elizabeth Resenzweig
Anna Pandolfo
Journal: 
Journal of Usability Studies
pp: 
7-21
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
This paper compares the relative merit in realistic versus lab style experiments for testing voting technology. By analyzing three voting experiments, we describe the value of realistic settings in showing the enormous challenges for voting process control and consistent voting experiences.

Residual Vote in the 2004 Election

Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
Journal: 
Election Law Journal
pp: 
158-169
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
04/01/2006
No abstract available.

Controlling Democracy: The Principal-agent Problems In Election Administration

Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
R. Michael Alvarez
Journal: 
Policy Studies Journal
pp: 
491-510
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Election reform has become a major issue since the 2000 election, but little consideration has been given to the issues associated with managing them. In this article, we use principal agent theory to examine the problems associated with Election Day polling place voting. We note that Election Day voting manifests problems that agency theory shows are difficult to overcome, including adverse selection of and shirking by poll workers.

How Much is Enough? The 'Ballot Order Effect' and the Use of Social Science Research in Election Law Disputes

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
D.E. "Betsy" Sinclair
Richard L. Hasen
Journal: 
Election Law Journal
pp: 
40-56
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
03/01/2006
No abstract available.

The Introduction of Voter Registration and Its Effect on Turnout

Author(s): 
Stephen Ansolabehere
David Konisky
Journal: 
Political Analysis
pp: 
83-100
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Studies of voter turnout across states find that those with more facilitative registration laws have higher turnout rates. Eliminating registration barriers altogether is estimated to raise voter participation rates by up to 10%. This article presents panel estimates of the effects of introducing registration that exploits changes in registration laws and turnout within states. New York and Ohio imposed registration requirements on all of their counties in 1965 and 1977, respectively.

A Day of Poll Watching, Reno and Sparks, Nevada

Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Journal: 
User Experience Magazine
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Across the United States, I have personally watched hundreds of precincts vote since 2001. Most recently, I traveled to Reno/Sparks, Nevada to observe the rollout of the Sequoia Direct record electronic voting systems with verifiable paper trail printers on September 7, 2004. This experience was also enriched by the members of the Secretary of State of California’s poll-watching effort, who invited me to join them to watch the election progress at eleven different polling places, which together represent almost forty different precincts.

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