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Use this page to browse all content from the Voting Technology Project, sorted by last updated.

Voting Machines, Race and Equal Protection

Author(s): 
Stephen Ansolabehere
Journal: 
Election Law Journal
pp: 
61-70
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
No abstract available.

Who Overvotes, Who Undervotes, Using Punchcards? Evidence from Los Angeles County

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
D.E. "Betsy" Sinclair
Journal: 
Political Research Quarterly
pp: 
15-25
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
In this study we examine over- and undervotes from the November 2000 General Election in Los Angeles County. Los Angeles County is the nation's largest election jurisdiction and it used a punchcard voting system in that election. We use precincts as our unit of analysis and merge the 2000 election data with census data and voter registration data; our dataset allows us to examine all of the countywide races in 2000 (including candidate and ballot measures).

The SAVE System: Secure Architecture for Voting Electronically

Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Jonathan Goler
Journal: 
BT Technology Journal
pp: 
89-119
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Existing technology is capable of yielding secure, reliable, and auditable voting systems. This system outlines an architecture for polling place electronic voting, based on redundancy at each stage of the ballot submission process that is resistant to external hacking and internal insertion of malicious code. The proposed architecture addresses all layers of the system beyond the point when a voter commits the ballot. These steps include the verification of eligibility to vote, authentication, and aggregation of the vote.

The Likely Consequences of Internet Voting for Political Representation

Author(s): 
Jonathan Nagler
R. Michael Alvarez
Journal: 
Loyola Law Review
pp: 
1115-1153
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
In this Article, Professors R. Michael Alvarez and Jonathan Nagler consider the consequences of Internet voting for political representation. They believe that based on the evidence presented Internet voting is likely to exacerbate the current problem of class-bias in American elections if it is introduced any time in the near future. The authors maintain that previous reforms to ease voting or registration have tended to be taken advantage of by those of higher socio-economic status.

Why Everything That Can Go Wrong Often Does: An Analysis of Election Administration Problems

Working Paper No.: 
10
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
The Century Foundation
R. Michael Alvarez
Before the 2000 presidential election, few citizens in the United States paid much attention to election administration. But scholars have noted that election administration has been a problem for decades. Despite the attention paid to election administration in the research literature, most public policy efforts in since 2000 have been focused on purchasing new voting equipment and fixing problematic procedures, and not on resolving some of the underlying problems in the process of conducting elections in America.

The Complexity of the California Recall Election

Working Paper No.: 
9
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
D. Roderick Kiewiet
Caltech
Melanie Goodrich
The October 7, 2003 California Recall Election strained California’s direct democracy. In recent California politics there has not been a statewide election conducted on such short notice; county election officials were informed on July 24 that the election would be held on October 7. Nor has California recently seen a ballot with so many candidates running for a single statewide office. With easy ballot access requirements, Secretary of State Kevin Shelley certified 135 candidates for the official ballot on August 13.

Vertical Proximity Effects in the California Recall Election

Working Paper No.: 
8
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Sarah M. Sled
MIT
The 2003 California recall election provides a unique opportunity to assess the impact of variations in ballot design and voting methods on the voting accuracy of citizens. Analysis of the results of the California Recall election demonstrates that candidates who were vertically adjacent to the top three vote getters received “extra” votes in the recall election – a vertical proximity effect. Combined, these ‘neighbor’ candidates received approximately 4 votes per thousand votes the top candidate received.

Who Overvotes, Who Undervotes, Using Punchcards? Evidence from Los Angeles County

Working Paper No.: 
7
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
D.E. "Betsy" Sinclair
Caltech
R. Michael Alvarez
In this study we examine over- and undervotes from the November 2000 General Election in Los Angeles County. Los Angeles County is the nation's largest election jurisdiction and it used a punchcard voting system in that election. We use precincts as our unit of analysis and merge the 2000 election data with census data and voter registration data; our dataset allows us to examine all of the countywide races in 2000 (including candidate and ballot measures).

Whose Absentee Votes Are Counted?

Working Paper No.: 
6
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
The Century Foundation
R. Michael Alvarez
Absentee voting is becoming more prevalent throughout the United States. While there has been some research focused on who votes by absentee ballot, little research has considered another important question about absentee voting: Which absentee ballots are counted, and which are not? Research following the 2000 presidential election has studied the problem of uncounted ballots for precinct voters, but not for absentee voters.

Election Day Voter Registration in the United States: How One-Step Voting Can Change the Composition of the American Electorate

Working Paper No.: 
5
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Stephen Ansolabehere
For most Americans, voting requires two steps. First, an eligible citizen must register in some manner with an appropriate government agency. Second, once registered, the citizen can then cast a ballot on or before election day. The historical record provides examples of voter registration processes as early as 1801 in the state of Massachusetts, followed by Columbia, South Carolina in 1819, the state of Pennsylvania in 1836, and New York City in 1840. After the Civil War, voter registration systems proliferated throughout the nation, especially in large urban areas of the county.

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