Browse Content

Use this page to browse all content from the Voting Technology Project, sorted by last updated.

Resolving Voter Registration Problems: Making Registration Easier, Less Costly and More Accurate

Working Paper No.: 
87
Date Published: 
08/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
R. Michael Alvarez
Introduction The practice of voter registration has a long history in the United States. In 1800, Massachusetts was the first state to impose a voter registration requirement. By Reconstruction, voter registration was used in a handful of states, typically in urban areas, as a tool to prevent multiple voting. By early in the twentieth century, most states required voter registration.

Voting Technology and Innovation

Working Paper No.: 
86
Date Published: 
08/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The 2008 election was different from the last two presidential elections in that there was a clear winner on Election Day and the winner was a Democrat, Barack Obama. Controversies over voting technology that raged in 2000 and 2004 were relatively dormant. Instead, the election controversies that did come up were mostly discussions of lines to vote. This lack of discussion does not mean that there were not important issues related to voting technology that took place in 2008, just that they were not things deemed important by the media.

2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections

Working Paper No.: 
81
Date Published: 
07/01/2009
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
MIT
Survey Background • Gauging the quality of the voting experience • Research design – 200 respondents contacted in every state, or 10,000 total – Survey in the field the week following Nov. 4 – Pilot surveys conducted on in Nov. ’07 and Super Tuesday ’08 – Parallel nationwide survey • Limited set of questions • 32,800 total respondents

2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections

Charles Stewart is giving a presentation at the IACREOT 38th Annual Summer Conference & Trade Show in Spokane, Washington this week (July 7-11, 2009). Attached is his presentation on the 2008 Survey of the Performance of American Elections.

Voting Technology and Innovation

Working Paper No.: 
78
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The 2008 election was different from the last two presidential elections in that there was a clear winner on Election Day and the winner was a Democrat, Barack Obama. Controversies over voting technology that raged in 2000 and 2004 were relatively dormant. Instead, the election controversies that did come up were mostly discussions of lines to vote.1 This lack of discussion does not mean that there were not important issues related to voting technology that took place in 2008, just that they were not things deemed important by the media.

Voter Attitudes Toward Poll Workers in the 2008 Election

Working Paper No.: 
77
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
At a conference on election reform held by the National Academies of Science in 2004, Indiana’s Secretary of State, Todd Rokita, referred to poll workers as “the street level lawyers” of elections. The reason for his statement was obvious: poll workers, in polling places, are the people who determine how well an election is run and have the power over its implementation (Alvarez and Hall 2006; Claassen, Magleby, Monson, and Patterson 2008; Hall, Monson, and Patterson, forthcoming).

Correcting for Survey Misreports using Auxiliary Information with an Application to Estimating Turnout

Working Paper No.: 
74
Date Published: 
05/01/2009
Author(s): 
Jonathan N. Katz
California Institute of Technology
Gabriel Katz
Abstract

Is There Racial Discrimination at the Polls? Voters' Experience in the 2008 Election

Working Paper No.: 
73
Date Published: 
03/01/2009
Author(s): 
Stephen Ansolabehere
Harvard University
In 1965, the United States Congress enacted the Voting Rights Act to end discrimination against black voters at the polls in Southern states and throughout the nation. The Act prohibited the use of “tests” and other devices used to prevent people from voting. At issue was not the content of tests themselves but the wide latitude available to those charged with registering and authenticating voters.

E-Voting: Perspectives and Experiences

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Edited by S Jaya Krishna and Naveen Kumar
Chapter 14
Lessons and Trends in E-Voting: Initiatives in the US and Abroad by R. Michael Alvarez and Thad E. Hall

Pages