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Use this page to browse all content from the Voting Technology Project, sorted by last updated.

Building Secure and Transparent Elections through Standard

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Thad Hall
Journal: 
Public Administration Review
pp: 
828-838
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Election reform has evolved since the 2000 presidential election. One issue that has remained at the forefront of public debate is how to build confidence in the election process. The foundation for confidence is based on procedures for electoral security and transparency. In this article, the authors use legal theories of evidence and public administration theories related to standard operating procedures to consider how election fraud - and claims of fraud - can be prevented by having effective and rigorous chain of custody procedures.

Election fraud fears: the cure

Link to Article: 
Newspaper: 
Los Angeles Times
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
Op-Ed
Escalating rage over the role of ACORN in registering presumably Democratic voters threatens to undermine the political legitimacy of a Barack Obama victory Nov. 4. And perhaps that's the point. But if John McCain were well ahead in the polls, the left would undoubtedly be shouting about electoral-system failures to de-legitimize a GOP win. It is too late to tone down the rhetoric for 2008, but if we want to end these sorts of attacks, there's only one solution: States must become more serious about how they administer elections.

VOTER CONFIDENCE IN CONTEXT AND THE EFFECT OF WINNING

Working Paper No.: 
68
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Thad E. Hall
A number of recent studies examine how confident voters are that their ballots are counted as intended in U.S. federal elections from 2000 to 2004. One consistent finding of these studies is that, relative to Democrats, Republican voters tend to be more confident that their ballots are counted correctly. However, it is also the case that in terms of the national outcomes of the 2000 and 2004 elections, Republicans were victorious. Additionally, research suggests that in the 2004 election voters who cast a paper ballot are more confident relative to those who vote using

An Empirical Bayes Approach to Estimating Ordinal Treatment Effects

Working Paper No.: 
67
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Jonathan N. Katz
Caltech
Delia Bailey
Ordinal variables — categorical variables with a defined order to the categories, but without equal spacing between them — are frequently used in social science applications. Although a good deal of research exists on the proper modeling of ordinal response variables, there is not a clear directive as to how to model ordinal treatment variables. The usual approaches found in the literature for using ordinal treatment variables are either to use fully unconstrained, though additive, ordinal group indicators or to use a numeric predictor constrained to be

Internet Voting in Comparative Perspective: The Case of Estonia

Author(s): 
Alexander Treshsel
European University Institute in Florence
Italy
Journal: 
PS: Political Science & Politics
pp: 
497-505
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
07/01/2009
Several countries have conducted Internet voting trials in binding public elections over the past decade, including Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. These trials have been conducted at the local and regional levels of government, targeting specific populations of voters. However, Estonia—a former Soviet republic and now a full member of the European Union—has advanced the farthest in deploying Internet voting. Since 2000, Estonia has conducted two national elections in which all voters could use Internet voting.

Internet Voting in Comparative Perspective: The Case of Estonia.

Author(s): 
Alexander Treshsel
European University Institute in Florence
Italy
Journal: 
PS: Political Science & Politices
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Forthcoming

UOCAVA: A State of the Research

Working Paper No.: 
69
Date Published: 
01/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The problems faced by overseas civilians, military personnel, and their dependents—individuals covered by the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA)—have existed since the nation’s founding. From the Civil War to today, there have been efforts to improve voting for military voters, often to little avail. Since the 1960s, there have also been efforts to address the voting needs of civilians living overseas and the dependents of military personnel to cast ballots.

Mobilizing Pasadena Democrats: Measuring The Effects of Partisan Campaign Contacts

Working Paper No.: 
66
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Betsey Sinclair
Asa Hopkins
Michael Alvarez
This paper examines the effect of an entire campaign using a randomized field experiment here the treatment consists of campaign decisions made by a campaign manager. In contrast

Towards Better Voting Technology Research: Building a Research-Industry Dialogue

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
On March 13, 2007, the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project convened a Voting Systems Vendor Workshop on the Caltech campus involving a small group of academics and representatives from the voting systems industry. As an outcome of this one-day event, we present the following report and recommendations. This event was supported by grants from The Carnegie Corporation of New York and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. We thank them for their support of our ongoing efforts.

Same Day Voter Registration in North Carolina

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Jonathan Nagler
R. Michael Alvarez
We have analyzed the likely impact on voter turnout should North Carolina adopt same day registration. Under the system proposed in North Carolina, eligible voters who miss the 25 day registration deadline may take advantage of same day registration during a period that lasts 19 days to three days prior to the election. During this time, voters may go to designated locations, and with the appropriate documentation, both register and vote.

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