Latest Research from the VTP

THE NEW MEXICO 2006 POST ELECTION AUDIT REPORT

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Thad E. Hall
Journal: 
Collaboration with The University of New Mexico, Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, University of Utah
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
During the 2007 legislative session, the New Mexico Legislature passed a bill and Governor Richardson signed it into law, which provides for random voting system audits after every statewide general election (see §1-14-13.1, NMSA). Specifically, the law provides that county clerks are to compare the total votes tallied in the general election for the office of president or governor from a random selection of 2% of the voting systems used during the election throughout the state to a hand count of the ballots cast on that system. A voting system is

Report on Provisional Ballots and American Elections

Working Paper No.: 
115
Date Published: 
06/21/2013
Author(s): 
Daron Shaw, University of Texas at Austin
Vincent Hutchings, University of Michigan

Overview

Administration of Absentee Ballot Programs

Working Paper No.: 
112
Date Published: 
07/15/2013
Author(s): 
Barry C. Burden, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Brian J. Gaines, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Executive Summary

  1. Americans cast their ballots in three main ways: at a traditional neighborhood polling place on election day; early, in person at a government office or voting center; and absentee, which is usually submitted early by mail.  The proportion of all ballots cast by the latter two methods continues to rise steadily.

  2. The introduction and expanded use of convenience (absentee and early) voting does not seem to have increased voter turnout.

Voting by Overseas Citizens and Deployed Military Personnel

Working Paper No.: 
119
Date Published: 
06/01/2013
Author(s): 
Donald S. Inbody, Texas State University

Introduction

The Recruitment and Training of Poll Workers: What We Know from Scholarly Research

Working Paper No.: 
111
Date Published: 
09/06/2013
Author(s): 
Barry C. Burden, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Jeffrey Milyo, University of Missouri

In every election an army of temporary poll workers must be recruited and trained to both assist the public in exercising the right to vote and to enforce the rules governing the voting process.  These poll workers are geographically dispersed and serve as the front line workers interacting with tens of millions of voters.  Principal-agent theory suggests that this is a difficult task for election officials.

Lessons from the 2012 Election Administration and Voting Survey

Working Paper No.: 
113
Date Published: 
08/03/2013
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III, MIT
Daron Shaw, UT Austin

Since our country’s inception, collecting appropriate data on elections and the administration of elections has been somewhat problematic, due to the fact that multiple levels of government are involved in running elections in the U.S. and because of difficulties in obtaining comparable information from the different states and localities.  Beginning with the 2004 elections, the Election Assistance Commission has conducted national surveys of election administrators in an effort to facilitate a better understanding of how U.S.

Reducing Obstacles to Voting for People with Disabilities

Working Paper No.: 
116
Date Published: 
06/22/2013
Author(s): 
Lisa Schur, Rutgers University

The Presidential Commission on Election Administration’s mission includes identifying best practices and making recommendations to promote voting accessibility and improve the experiences of voters with disabilities.  This White Paper reviews the evidence on voter turnout and voting difficulties among people with disabilities, and identifies best practices for removing obstacles that can limit their ability to exercise the right to vote.  As will be seen, while progress has been made, significantly more needs to be done to make the election system fully accessible.

Voting: What Has Changed, What Hasn't, & Why Research Bibliography

Working Paper No.: 
108
Date Published: 
01/09/2013
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez, Caltech; Jonathan N. Katz, Caltech
Charles Stewart III, MIT; Ronald L. Rivest, MIT
Stephen Ansolabehere, Harvard; Thad E. Hall, University of Utah

Since the origins of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project in the fall of 2000, there has been an explosion of research and analysis on election administration and voting technology.  As we worked throughout 2012 on our most recent study, Voting:  What Has Changed, What Hasn’t, & What Needs Improvement, we found many more research studies.  In this research bibliography, we present the research literature that we have found; future revisions of this research bibliography will update this list.

Voting Made Safe and Easy: The Impact of e-voting on Citizen Perceptions

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez, Caltech
Ines Levin, University of Georgia
Julia Pomares, Center for Implementation of Public Policities Promoting Equity and Growth, Marcelo Leiras, Universidad de San Andres and Conicet
Journal: 
Political Science Research and Methods
pp: 
117-137
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
06/12/2013

AbstractVoting technologies frame the voting experience. Different ways of presenting information to voters, registering voter choices and counting ballots may change the voting experience and cause individuals to re-evaluate the legitimacy of the electoral process. Yet few field experiments have evaluated how voting technologies affect the voting experience. This article uses unique data from a recent e-voting field experiment in Salta, Argentina to study these questions.

Voter Confidence In 2010: Voter Identification, perceptions of Fraud, Winning and Losing and the Voter Experience

Working Paper No.: 
103
Date Published: 
04/17/2011
Author(s): 
Lonna Rae Atkeson, University of New Mexico

Over the last decade, scholars of American politics have invested research time and effort into the study of election administration and election performance.

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