Latest Research from the VTP

Residual Votes Attributable to Technology

Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
Stephen Ansolabehere
Journal: 
Journal of Politics
pp: 
365-389
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
We examine the relative performance of voting technologies by studying presidential, gubernatorial, and senatorial election returns across hundreds of counties in the United States from 1988 to 2000. Relying on a fixed-effects regression applied to an unbalanced panel of counties, we find that in presidential elections, traditional paper ballots produce the lowest rates of uncounted votes (i.e., “residual votes”), followed by optically scanned ballots, mechanical lever machines, direct register electronic machines (DREs), and punch cards.

Comparative Voting Performance of Reading Disabled Voters

Author(s): 
Jonathan A. Goler
Edwin J. Selker
Lorin F. Wilde
Journal: 
Interacting with Computers
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Although legislation now protects the rights of voters with special needs, no one has previously evaluated how different electronic voting systems affect the performance of the reading disabled community. Results of this initial study, evaluating three current systems, proved surprising and inform how future voting interfaces may potentially be improved for the population at large.

Election Auditing is an End-to-End Procedure

Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Journal: 
Science
pp: 
1873-1874
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
No abstract available.

A Methodology for Testing Voting Systems

Author(s): 
Ted Selker
Elizabeth Resenzweig
Anna Pandolfo
Journal: 
Journal of Usability Studies
pp: 
7-21
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
This paper compares the relative merit in realistic versus lab style experiments for testing voting technology. By analyzing three voting experiments, we describe the value of realistic settings in showing the enormous challenges for voting process control and consistent voting experiences.

Bridging Science, Technology, and Politics in Election Systems

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Erik Antonsson
Journal: 
The Bridge
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Shortly after the tumult of the evening of November 7 and the morning of November 8, 2000, the presidents of Caltech and MIT challenged us to solve the technological problems that had arisen in the election, especially with the punch-card voting systems that were widely disparaged after Florida’s presidential contest. Our initial research team spanned the continent and involved two campuses with different research and administrative cultures.

Residual Votes Attributable to Technology: An Assessment of the Reliability of Existing Voting Technologies

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
This report examines the use of voting equipment and the incidence of spoiled and unmarked ballots associated with that equipment. We call the rate of spoiled and unmarked ballots the residual vote rate. The residual vote rate is not a pure measure of voter error. If voting technologies are not producing voter mistakes or confusion, the residual vote rate should be unrelated to equipment. The study covers election results from over 2700 counties and municipalities in the 1988, 1992, 1996, and 2000 presidential elections.

Report to the Alexandria Board of Elections

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
During the 2002 general election, the Alexandria Board of Elections tested the Hart Intercivic eSlate voting system as a first step in determining how well an electronic voting system would work in the City of Alexandria. There are three key findings from the evaluation of this system.
  1. Alexandria voters are comfortable and satisfied with the current voting system that they have. Voters like the optical scan system and use it quite adeptly.

Voting Technology and Uncounted Votes in the United States

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
Stephen Ansolabehere
We examine the relative performance of voting technologies by studying presidential, gubernatorial, and senatorial election returns across hundreds of counties in hte United States from 1988 to 2000. Relying on a fixed effects regression applied to an unbalanced panel of counties, we find that in presidential elections, traditional paper ballots produce the lowest rates of uncounted votes (i.e. "residual votes"), followed by optically scanned ballots, mechanical lever machines, direct register electronic machines (DREs), and punch cards.

Voting in Massachusetts

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
Stephen Ansolabehere
Massachusetts avoided the most egregious shortcomings that dogged many other states in the 2000 presidential election. Perhaps for that reason, the Bay State has lagged behind most of the rest of the nation in reforming antiquated election practices and upgrading antiquated election technologies that confuse and frustrate voters. The result is tens of thousands of "lost votes" each statewide election--votes that could be recovered by adopting a range of sweeping and incremental reforms.

Are Americans Confident Their Ballots Are Counted

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Thad E. Hall
Morgan Llewellyn
Journal: 
Journal of Politics
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Expanding the large literature which investigates the characteristics of citizen and voter trust in government we analyze the heretofore neglected topic of voter trust in the electoral process. In this paper, we present results from three national surveys in which we asked voters the confidence they have that their vote for president in the 2000 or 2004 election was recorded as intended.

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