Latest Research from the VTP

Auditing Technology for Electronic Voting Machines

Working Paper No.: 
46
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Sharon Cohen
Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) voting machine security has been a significant topic of contention ever since Diebold voting machine code turned up on a public internet site in 2003 and computer scientists at Johns Hopkins University declared the machine “unsuitable for use in a general election.” Since then, many people from computer scientists to politicians have begun to insist that DREs be equipped with a paper trail. A paper trail provides a paper printout for the voter to approve at the end of each voting session.

Advances in Cryptographic Voting Systems

Working Paper No.: 
51
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Ben Adida
Democracy depends on the proper administration of popular elections. Voters should receive assurance that their intent was correctly captured and that all eligible votes were correctly tallied. The election system as a whole should ensure that voter coercion is unlikely, even when voters are willing to be influenced. These conflicting requirements present a significant challenge: how can voters receive enough assurance to trust the election result, but not so much that they can prove to a potential coercer how they voted?

The ThreeBallot Voting System

Working Paper No.: 
56
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Ronald L. Rivest
We present a new paper-based voting method with interesting security properties. The attempt here is to see if one can achieve the same security properties of recently proposed cryptographic voting protocols, but without using any cryptography, using only paper ballots. We partially succeed. (Initially, I thought the proposal accomplished this goal, but several readers discovered a vote-buying attack (see Section 4.4) that appears to be rather difficult to fix without making the resulting system much less usable in practice.

Assessing the impact of voting technologies on multi-party electoral outcomes

Working Paper No.: 
64
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Julia Pomares
Ernesto Calvo
Marcelo Escolar
This paper presents the first study on the impact of different voting technologies on election outcomes in multi-party elections, analyzing data from a large-scale voting experiment conducted in the 2005 congressional election in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Combining different regression models and matching methods, we estimate the effect of alternative voting technologies on the probability of support for the competing parties in the elections for congress and state legislature.

Who does better with a big interface? Improving Voting Performance of Reading Disabled Voters

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Lorin F. Wilde
Jonathan A. Goler
Ted Selker
This study shows how ballot interfaces variably affect the voting performance of people with different abilities. An interface with all information viewable simultaneously might either help orient or overwhelm a voter, depending on his/her skill-set. Voters with diagnosed reading disabilities performed significantly better on full-faced voting machines than those who demonstrated a high likelihood of similar, but undiagnosed, disabilities. In contrast, the diagnosed group performed worse than others when using standard-sized Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) systems.

LEVI User Manual

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Shawn Sullivan
A user manual for LEVI voting systems.

Augmenting Voting Interfaces to Improve Accessibility and Performance

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Lorin F. Wilde
Ted Selker
Jonathan A. Goler
Reading disabled (RD) voters represent approximately 1 in 7 voters. Current electronic voting technologies exhibit substantially different error rates between RD voters and non-RD voters. These error rates are not consistent. For example, full-faced voting systems are better suited for RD individuals, while page-by-page systems are better for non-RD voters. We seek to analyze the differences in the voter’s performance in order to build interfaces that reduce mistakes and errors for both RD and non-RD voters.

Towards Better Voting Technology Research: Building a Research-Industry Dialogue

Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
On March 13, 2007, the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project convened a Voting Systems Vendor Workshop on the Caltech campus involving a small group of academics and representatives from the voting systems industry. As an outcome of this one-day event, we present the following report and recommendations. This event was supported by grants from The Carnegie Corporation of New York and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. We thank them for their support of our ongoing efforts.

Internet Voting in Comparative Perspective: The Case of Estonia.

Author(s): 
Alexander Treshsel
European University Institute in Florence
Italy
Journal: 
PS: Political Science & Politices
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Forthcoming

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