Latest Research from the VTP

The Impact of New Technologies on Voter Confidence in Latin America: Evidence from E-voting Experiments in Argentina

Author(s): 
Julia Pomares
London School of Economics and Political Science
R. Michael Alvarez
Journal: 
Journal of Information, Technology and Politics
pp: 
1
Date Published: 
02/12/2011
We analyze trust in electronic voting in Latin America using data from two field experiments conducted in Argentina and Colombia. We find that voters generally exhibit high levels of confidence in e-voting, although this depends on individual characteristics such as age and education as well as on the particular type of technology used. We contrast our findings with those from industrialized democracies and show that conclusions derived from American and European e-voting experiences cannot be directly extrapolated to the Latin American context.

Election Administration Finance in California Counties

Author(s): 
Sarah A. Hill, California State University, Fullerton
Journal: 
The American Review of Public Administration
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
07/04/2011

Abstract Over the past decade, the federal and state governments have made large financial investments to improve election administration, but there is little to no understanding of the real workings and implications of election administration finance. This article takes a first look at election administration finance by examining election expenditures in California counties for fiscal years 1992 through 2008 using a public sector cost model.

Political trust and trust in the election process

Working Paper No.: 
19
Date Published: 
08/01/2011
Author(s): 
Leontine Loeber
University of Leiden
Voter confidence in election results is of the utmost importance for the legitimacy of the chosen legislators. When the trustworthiness of the techniques and methods that are used during the elections become subject of debate, this can have a negative impact on the confidence of voters. Previous research has shown that the level of trust in the election process in the Netherlands is not determined by a ‘winner-loser’ effect and that demographic variables only have a weak influence.

Voter trust in the Netherlands between 2006 and 2010

Working Paper No.: 
18
Date Published: 
08/01/2011
Author(s): 
Leontine Loeber
University of Leiden
Abstract: In this paper the trust of Dutch voters in the election process is examined. Since the Parliamentary elections of November 2006, large changes have surrounded the Dutch election process. The widely used voting machines that were introduced in the Netherlands in 1966 were decertified in 2007, causing a return to paper ballot voting. Discussions took place both in the media and in Parliament on election technologies and the trustworthiness of the election process.

Cambios en la forma de votar.

Date Published: 
08/01/2011
Author(s): 
Carolina Tchintian • Anastasia Peralta Ramos
Julia Pomares • Marcelo Leiras • María Page
En la Argentina utilizamos el sistema de votación de boletas múltiples, una por partido político o alianza. Sin embargo, algunas provincias comenzaron a introducir cambios en la forma de votar que están siendo implementados por primera vez durante el proceso electoral de 2011.

The Balance Between Preventing Fraud and Ensuring Participation: Attitudes Towards Voter Identification in New Mexico

Working Paper No.: 
106
Date Published: 
07/01/2011
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Lonna Rae Atkeson
This paper examines public opinion on the effectiveness and consequences of voter identification laws in New Mexico. In particular, it focuses on the attitudes central to the court reasoning in the 2008 Supreme Court case which upheld an Indiana photo-ID law, Crawford v. Marion County Election Board. Questions include whether or not voters think the ID laws protect against fraud and prevent legitimate participation, as well as which point of view voters find more compelling and whether or not attitudes towards voter identification are related to voter confidence.

Election Administration Finance in California Counties

Author(s): 
Sarah A. Hill
California State University
Fullerton
Journal: 
Annual Review of Political Science
pp: 
Forthcoming
Link to Article: 
Abstract

Voting Technology, Vote-by-Mail, and Residual Votes in California, 1990-2010

Working Paper No.: 
105
Date Published: 
05/05/2011
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Charles Stewart III
This paper examines how the growth in vote-by-mail and changes in voting technologies led to changes in the residual vote rate in California from 1990 to 2010. We find that in California’s presidential elections, counties that abandoned punch cards in favor of optical scanning enjoyed a significant improvement in the residual vote rate. However, these findings do not always translate to other races.

Voting Technologies

Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
MIT
Journal: 
Annual Review of Political Science
pp: 
353-378
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
05/01/2011
A renewed, energetic interest in voting technologies erupted in political science following the 2000 presidential election. Spawned initially by the recount controversy in Florida, the literature has grown to consider the effects of voting technologies on the vote choice more generally. This literature has explained why localities have the voting technologies (lever machines, punch cards, etc.) they use.

Partisan Bias in Evaluating U.S. Elections during the HAVA Decade: A Natural Experiment

Date Published: 
04/01/2011
Author(s): 
Shaun Bowler
University of California
Riverside
Controversies over the conduct of elections prompted a variety of reform efforts during the last decade, notably The Help America Vote Act. HAVA and state-level measures like California's Voting Modernization Bond Act allowed local governments to replace obsolete election equipment with more technologically advanced voting machines. The machinery of democracy appears to affect voter confidence in elections. However, these judgments are also associated with party identification and other voter characteristics.

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