Latest Research from the VTP

Voting Machines and the Underestimate of the Bush Vote

Date Published: 
12/05/2004
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
  1. A series of claims have been made in recent days alleging that discrepancies between exit poll results and the presidential vote in certain states provides evidence of malfeasance in those states. These claims seem to be concentrated on states using electronic voting systems.
  2. Exit polls predicted a significantly greater vote for Kerry nationwide than the official results confirmed, but there is not any apparent systematic bias when we take this same analysis to the state level.

Assessing Electoral Performance in New Mexico Using an Ecosystem

Date Published: 
04/26/2010
Author(s): 
Lonna Rae Atkeson
University of New Mexico
R. Michael Alvarez
Election administration in New Mexico has been closely scrutinized since the close 2000 presidential election, which was decided by a mere 316 votes. In that election, questions arose about the adequacy of New Mexico’s voting systems and the efficiency of the election administration process.1 In 2002 the passage of the Help America Vote Act sent federal resources to state agencies to purchase new equipment. In New Mexico some of this money was passed on to county clerks, many of who purchased new electronic voting equipment.

Voting Technology and the Election Experience: The 2009 Gubernatorial Races in New Jersey and Virginia

Working Paper No.: 
99
Date Published: 
07/14/2010
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
R. Michael Alvarez
Abstract: In this paper, we examine the attitudes of voters regarding the voting experience in the 2009 gubernatorial elections in New Jersey and Virginia. We focus especially on the way in which voting technology experiences that voters have had affect their confidence in the voting process, their attitudes toward fraud and reform, and other aspects of the voting process. We find that voters are sensitive to the voting mode they use—in person voting compared to absentee voting—as well as to whether they get to vote on the technology they prefer (paper versus electronic).

Voter Opinions about Election Reform: Do They Support Making Voting More Convenient?

Working Paper No.: 
98
Date Published: 
07/14/2010
Author(s): 
Charles Stewart III
MIT
Ines Levin
We study public opinions about convenience voting reforms, using a unique state-by-state survey conducted in the 2008 presidential election. Our analysis of the American voting public’s support for potential convenience voting reforms provides a variety of important insights into the potential direction of innovations in the electoral process in the near future. First, we find that the most prominent convenience voting reforms have mixed support. These include attitudes toward automatic voter registration, Election Day voter registration, and moving Election Day to

Correcting for Survey Misreports using Auxiliary Information with an Application to Estimating Turnout

Author(s): 
Jonathan N. Katz
Caltech
Gabriel Katz
Journal: 
AJPS
pp: 
815-835
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
06/21/2010
Misreporting is a problem that plagues researchers that use survey data. In this paper, we give conditions under which misreporting will lead to incorrect inferences. We then develop a model that corrects for misreporting using some auxiliary information, usually from an earlier or pilot validation study. This correction is implemented via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods, which allows us to correct for other problems in surveys, such as non-response. This correction will allow researchers to continue to use the non-validated data to make inferences.

Voter Registration List Quality Pilot Studies: Report on Detailed Results

Date Published: 
06/08/2010
Author(s): 
Stephen Ansolabehere
Department of Government
Harvard University
Between August 2008 and July 2009, audits were conducted to assess the quality of voter registration lists in two areas of the United States. These audits, conducted by Professors Stephen Ansolabehere and Alan Gerber with research assistance from David Doherty and Eitan Hersh, and funded by the Pew Center on the States, represent an initial e

The American Internet Voter

Working Paper No.: 
97
Date Published: 
09/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
Betsy Sinclair
Since the creation of the Internet, there have been a seemingly never-ending number of books and analyses about the role of the Internet in Politics. Many of these books fail to keep in mind that the behavior of elites--well-educated and politically active individuals who often represent the peer group of these authors--is not generally representative of the behavior of the public at large. Pundits and political campaign, but few have systemically examined the role of the Internet in participatory politics for the average voter.

Scantegrity II Municipal Election at Takoma Park: The First E2E Binding Governmental Election with Ballot Privacy

Working Paper No.: 
96
Date Published: 
02/01/2010
Author(s): 
Richard Carback
UMBC CDL; Jeremy Clark
University of Waterloo; John Conway
On November 3, 2009, voters in Takoma Park, Maryland, cast ballots for mayor and city council members using the ScantegrityII voting system—the first time any end-to-end (e2e) voting system with ballot privacy has been used in any binding governmental election. This case-study describes how we carried out this complex engineering feat involving improved design and implementation of a novel cryptographic voting system, streamlined procedures, agreements with the City, and assessments of the experiences of voters and poll workers.

Making Voting Easier: Convenience Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election

Working Paper No.: 
95
Date Published: 
03/15/2010
Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Ines Levin
In this study we analyze the choice of voting mode in the 2008 presidential election. We use a large-sample survey with national coverage that allows us to overcome limitations of previous studies. Our analysis provides a number of insights into some of the important debates about convenience voting. Among other things, we find little support for the hypothesis that convenience voting methods have partisan implications; although we do find voter attributes that lead to the choice of some particular convenience voting mode.

A Supervised Machine Learning Procedure to Detect Electoral Fraud using Digital Analysis

Working Paper No.: 
11
Date Published: 
03/29/2010
Author(s): 
Sebastian M. Saiegh
University of California
San Diego
This paper introduces a naive Bayes classi

Pages