Latest Research from the VTP

I Will Register, if You Teach Me How: Results from Voter Registration Field Experiments on College Campuses

Working Paper No.: 
7
Date Published: 
01/01/2009
Author(s): 
David W. Nickerson
University Notre Dame
Elizabeth A. Bennion
ABSTRACT:

Correcting for Survey Misreports using Auxiliary Information with an Application to Estimating Turnout

Working Paper No.: 
74
Date Published: 
05/01/2009
Author(s): 
Jonathan N. Katz
California Institute of Technology
Gabriel Katz
Abstract

Policy-based abstention in Brazil's 2002 presidential election

Working Paper No.: 
80
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Gabriel Katz
Caltech
Abstract

Voting Technology and Innovation

Working Paper No.: 
78
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The 2008 election was different from the last two presidential elections in that there was a clear winner on Election Day and the winner was a Democrat, Barack Obama. Controversies over voting technology that raged in 2000 and 2004 were relatively dormant. Instead, the election controversies that did come up were mostly discussions of lines to vote.1 This lack of discussion does not mean that there were not important issues related to voting technology that took place in 2008, just that they were not things deemed important by the media.

Voter Attitudes Toward Poll Workers in the 2008 Election

Working Paper No.: 
77
Date Published: 
04/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
At a conference on election reform held by the National Academies of Science in 2004, Indiana’s Secretary of State, Todd Rokita, referred to poll workers as “the street level lawyers” of elections. The reason for his statement was obvious: poll workers, in polling places, are the people who determine how well an election is run and have the power over its implementation (Alvarez and Hall 2006; Claassen, Magleby, Monson, and Patterson 2008; Hall, Monson, and Patterson, forthcoming).

Electronic Elections in a Politicized Polity

Working Paper No.: 
76
Date Published: 
06/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
Abstract

UOCAVA: A State of the Research

Working Paper No.: 
69
Date Published: 
01/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The problems faced by overseas civilians, military personnel, and their dependents—individuals covered by the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA)—have existed since the nation’s founding. From the Civil War to today, there have been efforts to improve voting for military voters, often to little avail. Since the 1960s, there have also been efforts to address the voting needs of civilians living overseas and the dependents of military personnel to cast ballots.

On American Voter Confidence

Author(s): 
R. Michael Alvarez
Caltech
Thad Hall
Journal: 
University of Arkansas Law Review
pp: 
651-668
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
06/01/2007
SUMMARY:

Is There Racial Discrimination at the Polls? Voters' Experience in the 2008 Election

Working Paper No.: 
73
Date Published: 
03/01/2009
Author(s): 
Stephen Ansolabehere
Harvard University
In 1965, the United States Congress enacted the Voting Rights Act to end discrimination against black voters at the polls in Southern states and throughout the nation. The Act prohibited the use of “tests” and other devices used to prevent people from voting. At issue was not the content of tests themselves but the wide latitude available to those charged with registering and authenticating voters.

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