Voting Technology

Internet Voting in Comparative Perspective: The Case of Estonia.

Author(s): 
Alexander Treshsel
European University Institute in Florence
Italy
Journal: 
PS: Political Science & Politices
pp: 
Link to Article: 
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Forthcoming

UOCAVA: A State of the Research

Working Paper No.: 
69
Date Published: 
01/01/2009
Author(s): 
Thad E. Hall
University of Utah
The problems faced by overseas civilians, military personnel, and their dependents—individuals covered by the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA)—have existed since the nation’s founding. From the Civil War to today, there have been efforts to improve voting for military voters, often to little avail. Since the 1960s, there have also been efforts to address the voting needs of civilians living overseas and the dependents of military personnel to cast ballots.

Residual Votes Attributable to Technology: An Assessment of the Reliability of Existing Voting Technologies

Working Paper No.: 
2
Date Published: 
11/30/2008
Author(s): 
Voting Technology Project
American elections are conducted using a hodge-podge of different voting technologies: paper ballots, lever machines, punch cards, optically scanned ballots, and electronic machines. And the technologies we use change frequently. Over the last two decades, counties have moved away from paper ballots and lever machines and toward optically scanned ballots and electronic machines. The changes have not occurred from a concerted initiative, but from local experimentation. Some local governments have even opted to go back to the older methods of paper and levers.

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